Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: jewelers corner

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,922

    Default jewelers corner

    Since I have been called out, I will attempt to enlighten you on different aspects of jewelry, watches and clocks.The first we will cover is metals.Gold and siver are the most common of metals that are used in Jewelry so we will begin there
    .The two metals are hypo allergenic, with the exception of "wet chemistry" which creates salts that sometimes can cause reactions. You cannot be allergic to gold, gold salts, are another matter. Gold by itself is chemically inactive and as such would be impossible to be allergic to. With the addition of alloys [most all jewelry is an alloy] comes the supposed allergy to gold. Even some of these contact dermatitis allergies can be caused by other elements. First, gold alloys are porous, and as such collect oils,chemicals, perfumes, and mostly dirt. I have weighed jewelry before and after cleaning, and I can tell you something is leaving during the action. Dirt allergies are amongst the most common, and if you don't react for several hours after putting jewelry on, this may be your culprit. I find that most people do not clean their jewelry very well, or at all. Jewelry cleaners must be talked about at this point so I will tell you that soap and water are best. Not lanolin based soaps, but soaps that remove oils and grease. These are the things you must remove to keep your jewelry from bothering you. Diamonds especially have an affinity for oil, and after they acquire the oil, they collect dirt, or the oil does. If you use prepared jewelry cleaners, read the directions, most say dip for a few seconds, if you leave your jewelry in an ammonia based cleaner, you will do irreparable damage to the alloy. The best way to clean jewelry at home is with something like Joy dish soap and a soft toothbrush.
    Contact dermatitis can also be caused by abrasion. As in any case if you cut or scratch your self, skin reactions occur. Alloys that are too porous can actually have such a rough texture to cause these little dermal scratches, and as such lead to a reaction. Another cause of abrasion is the fact that jewelry is getting thinner, and as such some times the culet, or bottom point actually protrudes from the bottom of the piece and it is the culet that is scratching you. Yet another cause that is becoming more common is poor polishing that leaves small sharp points that irritate the skin. Case in point, I had a lady come in to get rid of the earrings given to her, she said she must be allergic, after checking the cleanliness of the piece I put it under magnification and could see small high points that were left in the castings. After polishing these off, miraculously her allergy disappeared.
    One last thing, Gold is chemically inactive, the alloy used is not, keep your jewelry out of Chlorine , Bromine, Ammonia. In other words, take your jewelry off when you swim in a Chlorinated pool, get into a hot tub, do any cleaning involving bleach or ammonia, when doing dishes,[this is because brushed stainless steel will destroy your prongs] and for GOD sakes take them off when making a meat loaf. Remember that diamonds have an affinity for grease, and that grease has an affinity for dirt, bacteria, and other gross things!
    coming to you live from police state "Kville"

  2. #2

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Angola, IN
    Posts
    6,345

    Default Re: jewelers corner

    I always take my wedding ring off before washing dishes, but mostly because I don't want to get any ick caught under it.
    Apples are good,
    Oranges are bad,
    Lemons are rude,
    Bananas are perverted,
    And kumquats are just, plain evil...

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Angola
    Posts
    514

    Default Re: jewelers corner

    Thanks Blue that was very informative, especially since I have a daughter that has never been able to wear earrings due to irritations.
    When my husband and I got married we bought white gold rings because we like the "silver" color better than the gold. Unfortunately, because of his job, my hubby's got really bent up. So last year for christmas I went to a jewelers and asked about the stainless steel rings that seem to becoming more popular. I found a set that I liked and bought them as a gift. We absolutely love them! They look heavy, but are actually pretty light, and they are durable too. My hubby can wear his to work and after a year ( almost ) is still in perfect shape. I got his gold one straightened and we still wear these for "good", but for everyday we love our stainless steel. Are you seeing this? Or are we alone?

    BTW our steel rings are etched and very pretty!
    We, your American Legion Riders, ride for God and country, the American Legion Family and Allied Veterans everywhere. Protect those who protect us. Amen.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,922

    Default Re: jewelers corner

    Quote Originally Posted by pixiegirl View Post
    Thanks Blue that was very informative, especially since I have a daughter that has never been able to wear earrings due to irritations.
    When my husband and I got married we bought white gold rings because we like the "silver" color better than the gold. Unfortunately, because of his job, my hubby's got really bent up. So last year for christmas I went to a jewelers and asked about the stainless steel rings that seem to becoming more popular. I found a set that I liked and bought them as a gift. We absolutely love them! They look heavy, but are actually pretty light, and they are durable too. My hubby can wear his to work and after a year ( almost ) is still in perfect shape. I got his gold one straightened and we still wear these for "good", but for everyday we love our stainless steel. Are you seeing this? Or are we alone?

    BTW our steel rings are etched and very pretty!
    I do not carry stainless, but it has proven itself in the piercing world. Stainless, or good stainless I should say is not porous, so it does not get infiltrated with dirt and other grimes. As for your daughter, if the earrings have plating it is usually nickel, and most earrings I have seen from other places are plated. I do not carry plated earrings for that very reason. I also try very hard not to carry plated jewelry as it always causes one problem or another.
    coming to you live from police state "Kville"

  5. Default Re: jewelers corner

    Thank you Blue! Very informative! I was told long ago that toothpaste is a good jewelry cleaner, and it seems to polish the gold nicely. Any concerns with this?

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,922

    Default Re: jewelers corner

    Quote Originally Posted by Night Owl View Post
    Thank you Blue! Very informative! I was told long ago that toothpaste is a good jewelry cleaner, and it seems to polish the gold nicely. Any concerns with this?
    Toothpaste usually has an abrasive in it that can actually dull gold alloys, Toothpaste, while it smooths out scratches, leaves a much subdued finish. If you are wanting a polished appearence, and you want to do it your self, you should get a chamois stick,[this can be made by epoxieing a piece of chamois onto a flat maple stick], and charging it, take the stick and run it over several times] a piece of rouge. Rouge can usually be purchased at do it best hardware stores. A couple of swipes on your jewelry and it will start to shine. Or you can take it to your jeweler and he will do it for you. One word of caution, this should not be done frequently as every time you use any abrasive or polish you remove metal, this can lead to premature thinning, and wear out the piece.
    coming to you live from police state "Kville"

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,922

    Default Re: jewelers corner

    The number one killer of prongs, and the ultimate reason for loosing stones is your stainless steel sink. This wear can be readily seen under magnification and can be expensive to repair, The best thing to eliminate this is to remove your rings before putting your hands into the sink. Remember to to put your rings into a holder and use it regularly so it becomes a habit and you don't lose your rings. If you cannot remove your rings,[because you don't want to, or your hands are swollen] put a rubber glove on that hand [like Michael jackson only shabbier] so that no damage is done.
    coming to you live from police state "Kville"

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    336

    Default Re: jewelers corner

    Blue: A little off topic, but you seem very knowledgeable of metal, so I have a question: I have quite a bit of sterling silverware on display in racks around the house. Being exposed, tarnish is a problem. I have done a great deal of buffing and polishing…mostly copper and brass pieces (brass beds, copper kettles, etc.) and have *carefully* polished the silverware pieces from time to time on my various buffers as I get frustrated doing it by hand with polishing clothes. Is there something on the market that is effective for tarnish that is also less harmful to the silver? AND is there anything that will effectively protect said pieces from tarnish? I have many pieces in sealed shadow boxes that have been there for years and show very little tarnish, but is there anything for the exposed….and not-so-valuable pieces?
    “People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use.” -Soren Kierkegaard

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Angola, IN
    Posts
    6,345

    Default Re: jewelers corner

    Quote Originally Posted by blue adept View Post
    The number one killer of prongs, and the ultimate reason for loosing stones is your stainless steel sink. This wear can be readily seen under magnification and can be expensive to repair, The best thing to eliminate this is to remove your rings before putting your hands into the sink. Remember to to put your rings into a holder and use it regularly so it becomes a habit and you don't lose your rings. If you cannot remove your rings,[because you don't want to, or your hands are swollen] put a rubber glove on that hand [like Michael jackson only shabbier] so that no damage is done.
    I always take my wedding ring off before doing dishes, but mostly because I don't want to get grease or food debris caught between it and my finger.
    Apples are good,
    Oranges are bad,
    Lemons are rude,
    Bananas are perverted,
    And kumquats are just, plain evil...

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3,922

    Default Re: jewelers corner

    Quote Originally Posted by bigkneedgal View Post
    Blue: A little off topic, but you seem very knowledgeable of metal, so I have a question: I have quite a bit of sterling silverware on display in racks around the house. Being exposed, tarnish is a problem. I have done a great deal of buffing and polishing…mostly copper and brass pieces (brass beds, copper kettles, etc.) and have *carefully* polished the silverware pieces from time to time on my various buffers as I get frustrated doing it by hand with polishing clothes. Is there something on the market that is effective for tarnish that is also less harmful to the silver? AND is there anything that will effectively protect said pieces from tarnish? I have many pieces in sealed shadow boxes that have been there for years and show very little tarnish, but is there anything for the exposed….and not-so-valuable pieces?
    I have the same problem with any silver in the window. The sun is wonderful for tarnishing any type of silver so avoid if possible. there are several types of silver polish on the market for polishing, and for delaying tarnish. One of the best is hagerty's silver polish. It is a vile smelling brown liquid that is a royal pain in the posterior that works wonders. It will delay tarnish for quite a long time. If your silver does not need polished, just the tarnish removed, tarn-x works. Again it is vile smelling, just dip the piece until the tarnish disappears then rinse very well. Never leave the piece in the liquid. There are several cloths that when used with a charged spray will help delay tarnish as well. the best thing is not to touch silver as the salts in your perspiration will tend to hasten tarnish.
    coming to you live from police state "Kville"

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    336

    Default Re: jewelers corner

    Quote Originally Posted by blue adept View Post
    I have the same problem with any silver in the window. The sun is wonderful for tarnishing any type of silver so avoid if possible. there are several types of silver polish on the market for polishing, and for delaying tarnish. One of the best is hagerty's silver polish. It is a vile smelling brown liquid that is a royal pain in the posterior that works wonders. It will delay tarnish for quite a long time. If your silver does not need polished, just the tarnish removed, tarn-x works. Again it is vile smelling, just dip the piece until the tarnish disappears then rinse very well. Never leave the piece in the liquid. There are several cloths that when used with a charged spray will help delay tarnish as well. the best thing is not to touch silver as the salts in your perspiration will tend to hasten tarnish.
    Thanks for the info. I'll give it go.
    “People demand freedom of speech as a compensation for the freedom of thought which they seldom use.” -Soren Kierkegaard

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •